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Article
July 4, 1990

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in AIDS

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 1990;264(1):79-82. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450010083036
Abstract

CASE PRESENTATION  —John Williams, MDA 42-YEAR-OLD bisexual, white man presented complaining of progressive memory loss, confusion, and difficulty speaking for 1 week. The patient had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) a year earlier when he developed cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Three months before admission, Pneumocystis pneumonia was diagnosed and treated. At that time, radiation therapy for his cutaneous Kaposi's lesions was performed. A month prior to admission, he was found to have Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract.On admission he denied fever, sweats, headache, stiff neck, photophobia, seizures, or focal weakness. His medications were a combination product of sulfamethoxazale and trimethoprim and clotrimazole troches. Physical examination showed a temperature of 37°C; pulse rate, 82 beats per minute; blood pressure, 127/79 mm Hg; and respirations, 18/min. Notable physical findings included the cutaneous lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma, a 2/6 systolic ejection murmur at the left sternal border, and

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