[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.191.72. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 18, 1990

A Call About Erythropoietin: Conflict of Interest or Investment Opportunity?

Author Affiliations

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute University of South Florida Tampa

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute University of South Florida Tampa

JAMA. 1990;264(3):334. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450030050015

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

To the Editor.—  Much has been written about the ethics of marketing practices and trends of the pharmaceutical industry. Another event related to this subject that I would like to call to my colleagues' attention is a strategy recently practiced by the brokerage industry.A stockbroker called and indicated to my secretary that he was calling about erythropoietin. He, of course, did not tell my secretary that he was a broker, and she, of course, quite naturally thought he was providing prescribing and pharmaceutical information rather than soliciting a stock account with me.The stockbroker, from the Tampa, Fla, office of Shearson Lehman Hutton, admitted that his strategy was to solicit accounts specifically by calling physicians' offices to discuss the stock market profit potential of biotechnology stocks.I advised the stockbroker that, as an oncologist who prescribes the products he was discussing, I could not actively participate in specific issues,

×