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Article
July 18, 1990

Efficacious Treatments of PMS: A Need for Further Research

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry, Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans.

From the Department of Psychiatry, Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans.

JAMA. 1990;264(3):387. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450030111043
Abstract

Many women of childbearing age have some premenstrual symptoms. In various reports, between 3% and 15% have severe symptoms. The symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) have been described in poignant detail by patients, their families, and physicians for thousands of years. However, empirical data about this elusive and somewhat confusing syndrome have been obtained primarily during this century, and especially during recent years. Frank1 and Horney2 separately in 1931 described versions of PMS, explored possible etiological bases for the symptoms, and suggested approaches to treatment. Since that time, interest and research related to the syndrome have waxed and waned. Perhaps in part related to difficulties in obtaining direct hormonal assays, the myriad symptoms associated with PMS, and methodological difficulties and flaws in design, considerable disagreement has persisted concerning whether there is a well-defined syndrome, whether it should be defined as an emotional or physical disorder, what the etiological

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