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Article
August 8, 1990

Surgical Management of Complex Partial Seizures

Author Affiliations

From the Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Center and Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

From the Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Center and Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

JAMA. 1990;264(6):734-737. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450060080034
Abstract

CASE PRESENTATION  Jocelyn Jenkins, MDA 23-YEAR-OLD, left-handed white woman with a history of uncontrollable complex partial seizures was admitted to The Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Center for further evaluation and management.The patient was the product of a normal, spontaneous vaginal delivery and achieved normal early milestones. At age 18 months, after receiving smallpox vaccine, she experienced two febrile seizures. The second seizure was associated with transient right hemiparesis. She was treated with phenobarbital and was asymptomatic until about age 6 years, when she developed complex partial seizures that were refractory to high doses of many medications, both alone and in combinations. Some of the medications used were phenytoin sodium, phenobarbital, valproic acid, carbamazepine, and ethosuximide.A computed tomographic scan of the brain was normal. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2-weighted image showed an area of hyperintensity along the left periventricular white matter on both horizontal and coronal

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