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Article
August 15, 1990

Allied Health Education and Accreditation

Author Affiliations

Ms Gupta and Dr Hedrick are from the American Medical Association Division of Allied Health Education and Accreditation.

Ms Gupta and Dr Hedrick are from the American Medical Association Division of Allied Health Education and Accreditation.

JAMA. 1990;264(7):843-848. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450070071008

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Abstract

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE COMMITTEE ON ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION AND ACCREDITATION  For more than 50 years, the American Medical Association (AMA) and its members have recognized the value of actively participating in and promoting quality education for allied health personnel. This participation is increasingly important as it becomes more difficult to maintain an adequate supply of qualified professionals who complement, facilitate, or assist physicians as they provide health care services to the public.The history of specific AMA activities related to allied health education and accreditation is recorded in past Medical Education issues of The Journal of the American Medical Association. The current era began in 1976 with the establishment of the AMA Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA), a 14-member accrediting body staffed by the Division of Allied Health Education and Accreditation (DAHEA) and its three departments. The membership of CAHEA reflects the communities that hold

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