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August 22, 1990

Bovine Somatotropin Supplementation of Dairy CowsIs the Milk Safe?

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Metabolism Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo (Dr Daughaday), and the Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (Dr Barbano).; From 1984 to 1986, Dr Daughaday was the recipient of a research contract from Monsanto Company, a small fraction of which was paid to Dr Daughaday as a consulting fee. The contract was for purification of bovine insulinlike growth factor I from blood. Dr Daughaday has not received any funds from Monsanto subsequent to the above agreement.; Dr Barbano acted on behalf of Cornell University as the principal investigator for a research contract between Cornell University and Monsanto Agricultural Company entitled "Chemical Composition and Dairy Product Processing Characteristics of Milk Produced by Cows Treated With Recombinant Somatotropin" from January 1, 1986, through December 31, 1988.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Metabolism Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo (Dr Daughaday), and the Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (Dr Barbano).; From 1984 to 1986, Dr Daughaday was the recipient of a research contract from Monsanto Company, a small fraction of which was paid to Dr Daughaday as a consulting fee. The contract was for purification of bovine insulinlike growth factor I from blood. Dr Daughaday has not received any funds from Monsanto subsequent to the above agreement.; Dr Barbano acted on behalf of Cornell University as the principal investigator for a research contract between Cornell University and Monsanto Agricultural Company entitled "Chemical Composition and Dairy Product Processing Characteristics of Milk Produced by Cows Treated With Recombinant Somatotropin" from January 1, 1986, through December 31, 1988.

JAMA. 1990;264(8):1003-1005. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450080089037
Abstract

Complex, biologically active proteins (eg, enzymes and hormones) can be manufactured safely and cost-effectively through applications of biotechnology. Some of these proteins (eg, human insulin, human somatotropin, rennet for cheese manufacture) are currently approved for medical or food processing applications. Bovine somatotropin (bST) for lactating dairy cattle is another product that can be produced via biotechnology and may allow dairy farmers to produce milk at a lower cost. In 1985, based on an evaluation of toxicological data, the Food and Drug Administration concluded that milk and meat from bST-supplemented cows was safe and wholesome. The Food and Drug Administration has authorized the use of milk and meat from bST-supplemented cows in the commercial food supply. Its evaluation of the impact of bST supplementation on the long-term health of dairy cattle is near completion, and bST may be approved for commercial use in early 1991.

(JAMA. 1990;264:1003-1005)

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