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Article
August 22, 1990

Breast Carcinoma Metastatic to the Uvea

Author Affiliations

Albany (NY) Medical College; Wills Eye Hospital and Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pa

Albany (NY) Medical College; Wills Eye Hospital and Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pa

JAMA. 1990;264(8):1032. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450080122044
Abstract

A 45-year-old woman with a 1-year history of adenocarcinoma of the breast, metastatic to axillary lymph glands and both lungs, presented with a chief complaint of decreasing visual acuity. Examination revealed a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/50 in each eye. Isolated yellow subretinal masses, several disc diameters in size, with overlying pigment dispersion and serous retinal detachments were present in both eyes. Each macula was similarly affected (Fig 1).

A 57-year-old woman with a similar history presented with an amelanotic-appearing fluffy white mass in the temporal iris and an anterior chamber angle of her left eye, with seeding into the anterior chamber (Fig 2).

Both women had developed metastases to the vascular layer of the eye, the uvea. The uvea consists of the choroid posteriorly and the iris and ciliary body anteriorly. Metastases from adenocarcinoma can occur in either location, but more commonly involve the choroid.1

Metastatic carcinoma to

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