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Article
October 3, 1990

Low-Dose Aspirin for Migraine Prophylaxis

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass (Drs Buring and Hennekens); and the Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford University, Oxford, England (Dr Peto).

From the Departments of Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass (Drs Buring and Hennekens); and the Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford University, Oxford, England (Dr Peto).

JAMA. 1990;264(13):1711-1713. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450130083031
Abstract

The Physicians' Health Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that studied low-dose aspirin (325 mg every other day) therapy among 22 071 US male physicians aged 40 to 84 years. Annual follow-up questionnaires requested information on the occurrence of numerous medical conditions including migraine. At the end of 60 months, morbidity follow-up was 99.7% complete, and the reported consumption of aspirin or other platelet-active drugs was 86% in the aspirin group and 14% in the placebo group. Of those randomized to aspirin, 661 (6.0%) reported migraine at some time after randomization, as compared with 818 (7.4%) of those allocated to the placebo group, representing a statistically significant 20% reduction in recurrence rate. The rate of self-report of ordinary headache was similar in the two groups. These data indicate that migraine is mediated, at least in part, by the effects of platelets and suggest that low-dose aspirin should be considered for prophylaxis among those with a history of established migraine.

(JAMA. 1990;264:1711-1713)

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