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Article
October 10, 1990

The Advancement of Women in Academic Medicine

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine, and the Department of Pediatrics, Floating Hospital for Infants and Children, New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, Mass.

From the Department of Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine, and the Department of Pediatrics, Floating Hospital for Infants and Children, New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, Mass.

JAMA. 1990;264(14):1854-1855. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450140076037
Abstract

THE FIRST known woman medical graduate in the United States, Elizabeth Blackwell, surmounted numerous difficulties and graduated from Geneva Medical College, New York, about 1850. Over the next 120 years, few women followed her. Since the 1970s, however, the number of women entering medicine has burgeoned, so that in the academic year 1989-1990, 38% of entrants and 33.9% of graduates of US medical schools were women.1-3 In 1988 residency training groups, 49% of pediatric residents were women, 46% of obstetrics and gynecology residents, 39% of psychiatry residents, 30% of family practice residents, and 26% of internal medicine residents.1 A smaller proportion of women have been trained in surgery or the various surgical specialties. There is no evidence to support the often expressed fears that women will either practice significantly fewer hours or drop out of professional activities more often than do men.3 A number of women now

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