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Article
October 10, 1990

Orbital Hemangiopericytoma

Author Affiliations

From the Oculoplastic and Orbital Service, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, and the Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY. Dr Coden is now with the Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego.

From the Oculoplastic and Orbital Service, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, and the Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY. Dr Coden is now with the Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego.

JAMA. 1990;264(14):1861. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450140083040
Abstract

A 78-year-old healthy man, with a 30-year history of an increased prominence of the left eye, noted progressive proptosis of his left eye and increasing diplopia over a period of several years.

Visual acuity was 20/30 in both eyes, with decreased color vision in his left eye. An afferent pupillary defect was present in his left eye. There was a left proptosis of 9 mm with decreased retropulsion. Mild ptosis and decreased ductions in all directions were present, and the left optic disc was slightly swollen. Computed tomography revealed a circumscribed mass in the left superomedial orbit (Fig 1).

A lateral orbitotomy was performed, and a soft, purplish mass was excised. Pathological examination showed this lesion to be a hemangiopericytoma (Fig 2).

Hemangiopericytomas are vascular tumors composed of spindle-shaped or rounded cells with indistinct cell borders, proliferating around endothelium-lined capillaries. They can occur anywhere in the body and have even

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