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Article
October 17, 1990

Taps

Author Affiliations

Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC

JAMA. 1990;264(15):1950. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450150050029
Abstract

Her first baby died shortly after birth. Her second was stillborn. She desperately wanted a child. Now the time of birth of her third child was near, and she was scheduled for a cesarean section. I was the anesthesiologist.

It was not long after World War II—only a few short years—just enough time for our country to have been involved in another three-year war, commonly known as the Korean conflict. I guess "conflict" doesn't sound as bad as "war," but the thousands who died during that conflict are just as dead as any of those killed in the world's "greatest" wars. Any war is hell on earth! I had finished college and was now in medicine, so I escaped return to active service and another trip to foreign lands.

After the conflict was over, our city remained one of military might. Its uniformed men and women, and its planes and

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