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Article
October 24, 1990

Transcervical Balloon TuboplastyA Multicenter Study

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Human Reproduction, Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center, and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Ill (Drs Confino, Tur-Kaspa, and Gleicher); Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn (Drs DeCherney and Corfman); Methodist Center for Reproduction and Transplantation Immunology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind (Drs Coulam and Robinson); Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City (Dr Haas); the University of Maryland, Baltimore (Dr Katz); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles (Dr Vermesh).

From the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Human Reproduction, Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center, and Rush Medical College, Chicago, Ill (Drs Confino, Tur-Kaspa, and Gleicher); Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn (Drs DeCherney and Corfman); Methodist Center for Reproduction and Transplantation Immunology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind (Drs Coulam and Robinson); Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City (Dr Haas); the University of Maryland, Baltimore (Dr Katz); and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles (Dr Vermesh).

JAMA. 1990;264(16):2079-2082. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450160049027
Abstract

Transcervical balloon tuboplasty represents a noninvasive technique to treat proximal tubal occlusion. In a multicenter study, 77 women with confirmed bilateral proximal tubal occlusion underwent the procedure. In 71 patients (92%), at least one proximally obstructed fallopian tube was recanalized. Concomitant distal bilateral tubal occlusions were diagnosed after successful proximal tubal balloon recanalizations in 13 patients (17%). In the remaining 64 patients, 22 clinical pregnancies (34%) have been confirmed during a median follow-up period of 12 months. Among those, 17 (77%) resulted in normal deliveries and five (23%) resulted in a first-trimester miscarriage. One patient was diagnosed with an ectopic pregnancy. Among 25 patients who had not conceived within 6 months of the procedure, 17 (68%) demonstrated continuing tubal patency on repeated hysterosalpingogram. We conclude that transcervical balloon tuboplasty is a safe outpatient technique that may represent an alternative to in vitro fertilization or microsurgical reanastomosis of fallopian tubes.

(JAMA. 1990;264:2079-2082)

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