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Article
October 24, 1990

Apartheid MedicineHealth and Human Rights in South Africa

Author Affiliations

From the Committee on Health and Human Rights, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (Dr Nightingale); Science and Human Rights Program, Directorate for Science and Policy Programs, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC (Ms Hannibal); Department of Community Medicine, City University of New York (NY) Medical School (Dr Geiger); American Psychiatric Association and American Psychiatric Association Committee on Human Rights, Washington, DC (Dr Hartmann); Committee on Health and Human Rights of the Institute of Medicine and Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences (Dr Lawrence); and Office of Minority/National Affairs, American Psychiatric Association (Dr Spurlock).

From the Committee on Health and Human Rights, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (Dr Nightingale); Science and Human Rights Program, Directorate for Science and Policy Programs, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC (Ms Hannibal); Department of Community Medicine, City University of New York (NY) Medical School (Dr Geiger); American Psychiatric Association and American Psychiatric Association Committee on Human Rights, Washington, DC (Dr Hartmann); Committee on Health and Human Rights of the Institute of Medicine and Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences (Dr Lawrence); and Office of Minority/National Affairs, American Psychiatric Association (Dr Spurlock).

JAMA. 1990;264(16):2097-2102. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450160067031
Abstract

Human rights and health care under apartheid in South Africa were studied. Human rights violations, such as detention without charge or trial, assault and torture in police custody, and restriction orders, have had devastating effects on the health of persons experiencing them. These violations have occurred in the context of a deliberate policy of discriminatory health care favoring the white minority over the black majority. South Africa's medical societies have had mixed responses to the health problems raised by human rights violations and inequities in the health care system. The amelioration of health care for all and prevention of human rights violations depend on ending apartheid and discrimination and greater government attention to these problems.

(JAMA. 1990;264:2097-2102)

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