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Article
November 14, 1990

Exercise, Hypertension, and Left Ventricular Mass-Reply

Author Affiliations

Francis Scott Key Medical Center The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Md

Francis Scott Key Medical Center The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Md

JAMA. 1990;264(18):2387. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450180043026
Abstract

In Reply.—  As we mentioned in our article, pathological and physiological hypertrophy have been studied primarily in small animal models. A review of these studies1 suggests that despite an increase in left ventricular mass, exercise seems to improve or reverse many of the harmful effects of hypertension-induced pathological hypertrophy. Our study was not designed to evaluate the effects of exercise on the mechanical and/or biochemical properties of the hypertrophied heart. However, our results, during a 10-week period, showed an increase in left ventricular mass without a change in diastolic function, which was consistent with the physiological hypertrophy observed in exercise-trained normotensive persons and athletes. We also asserted, as does Dr Haywood, that there is a need for investigation of the long-term effects of blood pressure reduction by resistive exercise training that may increase left ventricular mass compared with therapies that may reduce left ventricular mass, such as weight

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