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Article
November 21, 1990

The Progress and Prospects of Psychiatry

Author Affiliations

From the Scientific Information Group, American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill.

From the Scientific Information Group, American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill.

JAMA. 1990;264(19):2549-2550. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450190081033
Abstract

In the early 1970s, many of my physician friends expressed surprise and disappointment at my decision to begin a residency in psychiatry after several years of training in internal medicine and duty as an army flight surgeon. "You're a good doctor. Why do you want to leave medicine?" My protests that I didn't think I was leaving medicine and hoped to be a good doctor specializing in psychiatry were often met with looks of exasperation.

Whatever basis those prejudices about psychiatry might have had 20 years ago has been all but eliminated by the remarkable developments in this specialty since that time. According to the report of the American Medical Association's Council on Long Range Planning and Development published in this issue of The Journal,1 the future of psychiatry promises to be exciting and productive. To provide additional context for the Council Report's extensively documented assessment of psychiatry's current

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