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Article
November 28, 1990

Association of Group C β-Hemolytic Streptococci With Endemic Pharyngitis Among College Students

Author Affiliations

From the Thomson Student Health Center, University of South Carolina, Columbia (Dr Turner); the Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Hayden and Lohr) and Student Health (Drs Kiselica and Fishburne, and Ms Murren), University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville.

From the Thomson Student Health Center, University of South Carolina, Columbia (Dr Turner); the Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Hayden and Lohr) and Student Health (Drs Kiselica and Fishburne, and Ms Murren), University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville.

JAMA. 1990;264(20):2644-2647. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450200052030
Abstract

Throat cultures were performed throughout 2 school years to determine whether non—group A β-hemolytic streptococci (NGA BHS) could be isolated more frequently in 232 college students who had symptomatic pharyngitis than from 198 age-matched controls with noninfectious problems. Duplicate throat swabs were inoculated onto plates that contained sheep blood agar, one plate being incubated in a 5% CO2 atmosphere and the other in an anaerobic environment. The BHS were grouped using latex agglutination. Among the NGA BHS, only those from group C were isolated significantly more often among the patients compared with the controls (26% vs 11%). Quantitative colony counts of isolates of group C BHS were generally higher among patients than controls. Patients with group C BHS had fever, exudative tonsillitis, and anterior cervical adenopathy significantly more frequently than did patients who had throat cultures that were negative for group C BHS. Group C BHS were epidemiologically associated with endemic pharyngitis in this college student population.

(JAMA. 1990;264:2644-2647)

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