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Article
November 28, 1990

Prospective Study of Estrogen Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

Author Affiliations

From the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital (Drs Colditz, Stampfer, Willett, and Speizer), the Department of Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School (Drs Hennekens and Rosner), and the Departments of Epidemiology (Drs Stampfer and Willett) and Nutrition (Dr Willett), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass.

From the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital (Drs Colditz, Stampfer, Willett, and Speizer), the Department of Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Harvard Medical School (Drs Hennekens and Rosner), and the Departments of Epidemiology (Drs Stampfer and Willett) and Nutrition (Dr Willett), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass.

JAMA. 1990;264(20):2648-2653. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450200056031
Abstract

We prospectively examined the use of estrogen replacement therapy in relation to breast cancer incidence in a cohort of women 30 to 55 years of age in 1976. During 367 187 person-years of follow-up among postmenopausal women, 722 incident cases of breast cancer were documented. Overall, past users of replacement estrogen were not at increased risk (relative risk, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.18), including even those with more than 10 years of use (relative risk after adjustment for established risk factors, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.45 to 1.10). However, the risk of breast cancer was significantly elevated among current users (relative risk, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.67). Among current users, a stronger relationship was observed with increasing age but not with increasing duration of use. These data suggest that long-term past use of estrogen replacement therapy is not related to risk of breast cancer but that current use may modestly increase risk.

(JAMA. 1990;264:2648-2653)

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