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Article
March 4, 1983

Visualization of One's Own Cataract

Author Affiliations

Patchogue, NY

JAMA. 1983;249(9):1152. doi:10.1001/jama.1983.03330330034026
Abstract

To the Editor.—  I read with interest Dr Thomas' letter (1982;248:1973) on how he visualized the image of his cataract.Cataracts may change the perception of color vision by filtering out the violet and blue rays so that the world appears rosier. Because of this, artists often tend to paint pictures in warmer hues in their later years, becoming bluer and colder after cataract surgery.A vitreous opacity developed in the dominant eye of Norwegian expressionist, Edvard Munch, at the age of 67 years. It cast a shadow in the shape of a bird with a long beak onto his retina. This bird is repeatedly shown in his later paintings.The whole area has been explored by Patrick Trevor-Roper.1

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