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Article
December 19, 1990

Lipoproteins and AtherogenesisCurrent Concepts

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, University of California—San Diego, La Jolla.

From the Department of Medicine, University of California—San Diego, La Jolla.

JAMA. 1990;264(23):3047-3052. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450230083034
Abstract

TODAY there is no longer any doubt about the causative relationship between hypercholesterolemia and premature atherosclerosis. The National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference on Lowering Blood Cholesterol Levels1 and the National Cholesterol Education Program that grew out of it2 were the culmination of many years of experimental and clinical research, including, importantly, a number of positive intervention trials that brought to a close the so-called Cholesterol Controversy,3 ie, the controversy as to the importance of hypercholesterolemia as a causative factor in coronary heart disease. Intensive lipid-lowering regimens have been shown not only to slow the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and reduce the risk of coronary events,4 but even in some cases to lead to absolute regression.5 Best medical practice now calls for appropriate treatment of hypercholesterolemia, and detailed guidelines for treating it are available.2,6

If we are, then, committed in any case to such

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