[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.141.60. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 26, 1990

Proportionate Mortality Trends: 1950 Through 1986

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Family Practice, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield (Dr Sutherland), and the School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago (Drs Persky and Brody).

From the Department of Family Practice, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield (Dr Sutherland), and the School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago (Drs Persky and Brody).

JAMA. 1990;264(24):3178-3184. doi:10.1001/jama.1990.03450240080044
Abstract

Mortality trends in the United States from 1950 through 1986 were analyzed for the conditions that are or have recently been among the six leading causes of death. The age-adjusted mortality rate for all causes has decreased from 841.5 to 541.7 per 100 000 population. Cause-specific, age-adjusted mortality rates have declined from 1950 through 1986 for cerebrovascular disease, injuries, perinatal conditions, heart disease, and influenza and pneumonia. Time trends in the proportion of persons dying of each of these diseases, however, have varied; the proportion dying of cerebrovascular disease, injuries, and perinatal conditions has decreased, and the proportion of persons dying of heart disease and influenza and pneumonia has remained fairly stable from 1950 through 1986. During this same time, age-adjusted death rates have increased for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and have remained fairly stable for malignant neoplasms, while the proportions of persons dying of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and malignant neoplasms have increased dramatically. For people aged 35 to 64 years, malignant neoplasms have now overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death. For those aged 65 years and older, heart disease remains the leading cause of death, accounting for almost 50% of all deaths in persons 85 years and older.

(JAMA. 1990;264:3178-3184)

×