[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.94.5. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 9, 1991

Hispanic Health: Time for Data, Time for Action

Author Affiliations

Dr Novello is the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service, and Drs Wise and Kleinman are staff members of the Office of the Surgeon General.

Dr Novello is the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service, and Drs Wise and Kleinman are staff members of the Office of the Surgeon General.

JAMA. 1991;265(2):253-255. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03460020107038
Abstract

It is the nature of health statistics to remind us of who we are. Be it information on morbidity, disability, or mortality, the power of health-related data lies in its unblinking capacity to reflect the currents of daily life and their roots in common origins and social ties. It is not surprising, therefore, that the analysis of health data is often conducted in terms of broad perceptions of ethnicity and race. This issue of The Journal breaks new ground in addressing the health issues of Hispanic communities in the United States. Currently the second largest minority group in the United States, the 20 million Hispanics represent an estimated 8.2% of the total population reported to the US Census Bureau in 1989. If current trends continue, Hispanics will represent the largest minority population in the United States by the early 21st century.

If nothing else, the collection of articles in this

×