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Article
December 28, 1994

Computer Networks as a Medical Resource-Reply

Author Affiliations

Veterans Affairs Medical Center Portland, Ore
Oregon Health Sciences University Portland

JAMA. 1994;272(24):1898. doi:10.1001/jama.1994.03520240026026
Abstract

In Reply.  —The WWW is an advanced Internet service that incorporates telnet, ftp, gopher, and other services into a coordinated package. A distinguishing feature of WWW is that data are presented as hypermedia in which text and images contain links to other resources that describe the data in more detail. A user can access one of these links by choosing reference numbers (for text) or by using a mouse to click on key words or icons in graphical images. There has been an explosive growth in WWW servers and access to them in 1994. To access this service, a client program such as Mosaic or Cello must be run on the local computer. These programs are graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and require a Windows environment (a Macintosh, PC with Windows, or an X Window platform with Unix). These programs require a direct connection to the Internet. For an individual with

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