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Article
February 27, 1991

Lovastatin Efficacy in Reducing Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels on High- vs Low-Fat Diets

Author Affiliations

From the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism, The Rockfeller University, New York, NY (Drs Cobb and Breslow), and Department of Community Health Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing (Dr Teitelbaum).

From the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism, The Rockfeller University, New York, NY (Drs Cobb and Breslow), and Department of Community Health Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing (Dr Teitelbaum).

JAMA. 1991;265(8):997-1001. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03460080067034
Abstract

The effectiveness of lovastatin was compared with both a high-fat vs low-fat diet. Hypercholesterolemic subjects were studied under metabolic ward conditions for diet periods of 3 weeks while receiving lovastatin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Multiple lipoprotein levels were measured during the final week of each diet period. Nineteen subjects completed the study on the high-fat (43% of kilojoules) diet and 16 on the low-fat (25% of kilojoules) diet. Lovastatin reduced total cholesterol by 23% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 30%, compared with placebo on both diets, with no significant diet-drug interaction. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was raised by 7% to 8% on the diet regimens. Addition of lovastatin to the low-fat diet permitted 80% of subjects on this diet, but less than 50% of those on the high-fat diet, to achieve current guidelines. Although lovastatin produces a comparable percentage reduction in lipoprotein profiles on either diet, the accompanying low-fat diet remains advisable for additional reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels to specified goals.

(JAMA. 1991;265:997-1001)

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