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Article
April 10, 1991

The Closing of Shasta General Hospital

Author Affiliations

Mercy Medical Center Redding, Calif
Redding (Calif) Medical Center
Shasta County (Calif) Medical Society
Shasta County (Calif) Deputy Administrative Officer
Lorne Caughlin Shasta Primary Care Clinic Redding, Calif

Mercy Medical Center Redding, Calif
Redding (Calif) Medical Center
Shasta County (Calif) Medical Society
Shasta County (Calif) Deputy Administrative Officer
Lorne Caughlin Shasta Primary Care Clinic Redding, Calif

JAMA. 1991;265(14):1827. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03460140055020
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Bindman et al1 contend that the closure of a public hospital negatively affects the health care status of the poor. Those involved in the closing of Shasta General Hospital agree with their conclusion but object to how they got there and how they express it.The question arises as to why the authors neglected to communicate with the following informed sources: Shasta General Hospital's former medical director, Redding (Calif) hospital administrators, the county administrative officer, the county health officer, or the county medical society. If they had made such efforts, they would have acquired some important facts.Virtually all Shasta General inpatients were cared for by house staff of the Shasta-Cascade Family Practice Residency, a program affiliated with the University of California at Davis. As Shasta General Hospital closed, Mercy Medical Center assumed sponsorship of the residency, anxious to preserve it as an access point for

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