[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 17, 1991

Race and Glaucoma

Author Affiliations

From the Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland.

From the Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland.

JAMA. 1991;266(3):410. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470030110034
Abstract

The medical community should sit up and take notice whenever a dramatic difference in the prevalence of a disease is identified in a particular population group. Whether it be a laboratory experiment or a cross-sectional survey, as in the article published in this issue of JAMA, "Racial Variations in the Prevalence of Primary Open-angle Glaucoma: The Baltimore Eye Survey,"1 such a study is worthy of widespread attention.

In the United States, where infectious eye diseases are not as prevalent as in third-world countries, glaucoma has become one of the leading causes of blindness.2 Tielsch et al have now shown that primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) has a remarkably higher prevalence in black members of the US population. Earlier reports pointed to this difference,3-6 but, until now, equivalent data derived from comparisons of subgroups within a single racially mixed population were not available. Given the

×