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Article
May 17, 1995

Psychoanalysis: Waning or Waxing?-Reply

Author Affiliations

Cleveland, Ohio
Albany, NY

JAMA. 1995;273(19):1491. doi:10.1001/jama.1995.03520430026025
Abstract

In Reply.  —In his response to our letter, Dr Poreh cites data showing that the proportion of psychiatrists and psychologists entering psychoanalytic practice has declined. He offers this fact as a rebuttal to our pointing out that claims of some sort of decline in psychoanalysis are false. If the number of psychiatrists and psychologists in the United States had been static during the two decades under consideration, Poreh's point would have merit. Instead, of course, both fields have undergone significant growth as new nonpsychoanalytic treatment modalities have been developed. These new biological and psychological treatment modalities have made it possible to treat conditions that are not amenable to psychoanalysis. However, at the same time, as we showed, the absolute number of psychoanalytic practitioners in the United States has increased significantly. In addition, Poreh accepts and then dismisses the data we supplied indicating the large increase in the absolute number of

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