[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.145.176.252. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 14, 1995

National Medical Association Surgical Section Position Paper on Violence PreventionA Resolution of Trauma Surgeons Caring for Victims of Violence

Author Affiliations

Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk; Highland General Hospital, Oakland, Calif; Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Okla; St. Francis Hospital Medical Center, Hartford, Conn; University of Cincinnati (Ohio) Medical Center; East Carolina University, Greenville, NC; University Medical Center, Las Vegas, Nev; District of Columbia General Hospital, Washington, DC; Broward General Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, Fla; Richland Memorial Hospital, Columbia, SC; Cooper Hospital University Medical Center, Camden, NJ; Los Angeles County+University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles; San Francisco (Calif) General Hospital; Jackson Memorial Medical Center, Miami, Fla; King-Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif; Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, NY; Brookdale Hospital, Brooklyn, NY; District of Columbia General Hospital, Washington, DC; Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC; Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC; Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, NY.
From the Divisions of Trauma-Critical Care at the following institutions: Los Angeles County+University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles (Dr Cornwell); Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC (Dr D. Jacobs); Morehouse University School of Medicine and Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Ga (Dr Walker); University of Connecticut School of Medicine and Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn (Dr L. Jacobs); Lincoln Medical Center, Bronx, NY (Dr Porter); and Charles R. Drew University and King-Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif (Dr Fleming). A list of members of the National Medical Association Surgical Section who contributed to this document appears at the end of the article.

JAMA. 1995;273(22):1788-1789. doi:10.1001/jama.1995.03520460070038
Abstract

The epidemic of intentional injury continues to be a leading cause of premature death in America. The ravages of violence are particularly devastating within the minority community. With this position paper from the Surgical Section of the National Medical Association (the country's oldest and largest organization of minority physicians), a group of trauma surgeons and surgical intensivists resolve to focus on underused violence prevention opportunities and to extend their spheres of influence beyond the walls of their institutions and emphasize violence prevention activities.

(JAMA. 1995;273:1788-1789)

×