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Article
July 12, 1995

Consent for Invasive Procedures in the Newly Deceased-Reply

Author Affiliations

Medical College of Pennsylvania Philadelphia

JAMA. 1995;274(2):129. doi:10.1001/jama.1995.03530020046026
Abstract

In Reply.  —Drs Brattebø and Wisborg raise an interesting point about practicing procedures on living patients. However, consent forms for surgery and other procedures are usually worded in such a way that the attending physicians "may utilize assistants" as they see fit. In my practice, this is how many such teaching activities are justified on living patients. I do agree that in circumstances such as the resuscitation of a dying patient, this is a gray area, and the patient and family are often unaware of what actually transpires.On the other hand, I do not think that having a narrow majority of patient families in the studies1 agree to such teaching activities creates a clear mandate to allow for presumed consent for endotracheal intubation. Ideally, a policy should be crafted that all levels of the health care team would be aware of and support. Input into such a policy

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