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Article
September 13, 1995

Presidential Disability and the Twenty-fifth Amendment-Reply

Author Affiliations

Bowman Gray School of Medicine Winston-Salem, NC

JAMA. 1995;274(10):799. doi:10.1001/jama.1995.03530100037031

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Abstract

In Reply.  —Dr Toole and I agree, for the most part, with the letters concerning the discussion and comments on presidential disability. Certainly, the most difficult form of disability is dementia and loss of full cognitive powers, in part because such disease can be very difficult to diagnose in its early stages. Also, we agree with Dr Lee's assertion that a main objective is to find some way to strengthen the position of the physician to the president.

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