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Article
August 14, 1991

Use of Animals in Medical Education

Author Affiliations

Tucson, Ariz, Chair; Jacksonville, Fla; Royal Oak, Mich, Resident Representative; Durham, NC, Vice Chair; Beverly Hills, Calif; Minneapolis, Minn; San Antonio, Tex, Medical Student Representative; Syracuse, NY; Macon, Ga; Cleveland, Ohio; New Orleans, La; Baltimore, Md
From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill.

Tucson, Ariz, Chair; Jacksonville, Fla; Royal Oak, Mich, Resident Representative; Durham, NC, Vice Chair; Beverly Hills, Calif; Minneapolis, Minn; San Antonio, Tex, Medical Student Representative; Syracuse, NY; Macon, Ga; Cleveland, Ohio; New Orleans, La; Baltimore, Md
From the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill.

JAMA. 1991;266(6):836-837. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470060098034
Abstract

The use of animals in general medical education is essential. Although several adjuncts to the use of animals are available, none can completely replace the limited use of animals in the medical curriculum. Students should be made aware of an institution's policy on animal use in the curriculum before matriculation, and faculty should make clear to all students the learning objectives of any educational exercise that uses animals. The Council on Scientific Affairs recognizes the necessity for the responsible and humane treatment of animals and urges all medical school faculty members to discuss this moral and ethical imperative with their students.

(JAMA. 1991;266:836-837)

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