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Article
September 11, 1991

Salty and Bitter Taste

Author Affiliations

Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation, Ltd Chicago, Ill
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine

Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation, Ltd Chicago, Ill
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine

JAMA. 1991;266(10):1360. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470100052023
Abstract

To the Editor.  —Regarding Dr Henkin's discussion of phantogeusia,1 we recently evaluated 17 consecutive patients presenting to the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation with this chemosensory complaint. All patients underwent extensive chemosensory testing, neurologic and psychiatric examinations, and psychological testing including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory type II, the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory type II, and the Beck Depression Inventory.Whereas Henkin described anxiety and depression in idiopathic phantogeusia, we found no indication of depression in this group with average Beck scores of 8.5. The complaint of phantogeusia did suggest, however, that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised classification of generalized anxiety disorder was present.Since γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) abnormality exists in generalized anxiety disorder,3 it is possible that a common pathogenic mechanism causes both states. Therefore, we recommend adding clonazepam to the suggested treatments of this condition, which, in our

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