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Article
September 11, 1991

Braccio da Gamba

Author Affiliations

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

JAMA. 1991;266(10):1360. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470100052025
Abstract

To the Editor.  —A variety of injuries may complicate the professional pursuit of music making.1,2 Amateur musicians are not immune from medical complications of their avocation. The growing early-music movement has won many devotees, and numerous workshops now offer an opportunity for amateurs to work intensively for a week or longer in pursuit of their art. The following case history provides an example of the medical complications that may ensue from this involvement.

Report of a Case.  —A 54-year-old physician, devoted to the recreation of Renaissance and baroque music on the viola da gamba for more than a decade, attended an early music workshop for a week. His complete immersion in the workshop resulted in playing and practicing for 6 to 8 hours a day for 7 days, rather than his customary 2 hours a week. A feeling of strain in the muscles in the left forearm became apparent

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