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Article
October 23, 1991

Gifts to Physicians From Industry-Reply

Author Affiliations

American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Chicago, Ill

American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Chicago, Ill

JAMA. 1991;266(16):2222. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470160053020
Abstract

In Reply.  —When the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs issued its guidelines on gifts from industry to physicians, it also issued a report to the American Medical Association's House of Delegates explaining its reasons for the guidelines. The report, which is available from the Office of General Counsel, described three potential problems with industry gifts, which include that physician practices might be influenced, there would be an appearance of impropriety, and the costs of gifts are borne by patients.1The council also recognized that gifts from industry have made important contributions to patient care. Industry supports medical research, continuing education conferences, and professional journals.Indeed, Dr Noble agrees that patients benefit when industry subsidizes medical journals by advertising in them and, therefore, that physicians should be able to accept the gift of reduced subscription rates.It is difficult, to understand Noble's conclusion that subsidies for journals are acceptable

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