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Article
October 23, 1991

Discrepancies in the Reported Frequency of Cocaine-Related Deaths, United States, 1983 Through 1988

Author Affiliations

From the Biometrics Branch, Division of Injury Control, National Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga. Dr Lui is now with the Department of Mathematical Sciences, College of Sciences, San Diego (Calif) State University.

From the Biometrics Branch, Division of Injury Control, National Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga. Dr Lui is now with the Department of Mathematical Sciences, College of Sciences, San Diego (Calif) State University.

JAMA. 1991;266(16):2233-2237. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470160065033
Abstract

Objective.  —To assess the validity of cocaine-related mortality data available from the principal federal sources of information about the frequency of drug abuse deaths in the United States: the national vital statistics system and the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN).

Design, Setting, and Participants.  —We compared the number of cocaine-related deaths reported to national vital statistics and DAWN from 25 metropolitan areas during the years 1983 through 1988. We also compared cocaine-related mortality data reported to national vital statistics with data from all published forensic case series of cocaine-related deaths that occurred during the mid-1980s.

Results.  —During the 6-year study period, 75% more cocaine-related deaths were reported to DAWN (6057) than to national vital statistics (3466) from the 25 metropolitan areas that we studied. For individual metropolitan areas, the discrepancy between DAWN and vital statistics counts of cocaine-related deaths was as large as a sixfold difference. In six of the seven forensic case series identified in our literature search, the number of cocaine-related deaths exceeded the number of these deaths reported to vital statistics. The largest discrepancy was for cocaine-related deaths in New York, NY, during a 10-month period in 1986 for which 151 deaths were reported in a case series and seven deaths were reported to vital statistics.

Conclusion.  —Improvements in existing public health surveillance systems are needed for (1) full and accurate measurements of the lethal impact of drug abuse epidemics and (2) valid and comprehensive assessments of the effectiveness of national programs designed to prevent drug-related morbidity and mortality.(JAMA. 1991;266:2233-2237)

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