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Article
May 25, 1984

Brain Damage in Modern Boxers

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine (Dr Casson), and the Department of Psychiatry (Dr Siegel), Queens Hospital Center Affiliation of the Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical Center, Jamaica, NY; the Computed Tomography Center, Rego Park, NY (Dr Sham and Mr DiDomenico); the New York State Athletic Commission, New York (Dr Campbell); the Department of Neurology, SUNY at Stony Brook (Dr Casson); and the Department of Neurology, New York University Medical Center, New York (Dr Tarlau).

JAMA. 1984;251(20):2663-2667. doi:10.1001/jama.1984.03340440021020
Abstract

Eighteen former and active boxers underwent neurological examination, EEG, computed tomographic scan of the brain, and neuropsychological testing. Eighty-seven percent of the professional boxers had definite evidence of brain damage. All the boxers had abnormal results on at least one of the neuropsychological tests. Brain damage is a frequent result of a career in professional boxing.

(JAMA 1984;251:2663-2667)

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