[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.129.96. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 20, 1991

Medical ApartheidAn American Perspective

Author Affiliations

From the Community-Oriented Primary Care Program (Drs Brooks and Smith) and the Office of the President, Parkland Memorial Hospital (Dr Anderson), Dallas, Tex.

From the Community-Oriented Primary Care Program (Drs Brooks and Smith) and the Office of the President, Parkland Memorial Hospital (Dr Anderson), Dallas, Tex.

JAMA. 1991;266(19):2746-2749. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470190094036
Abstract

The suppressive policies and practices of apartheid in South Africa have directly contributed to preventable morbidity and mortality in black Africans. Due to socioeconomic segregation ("functional apartheid"), America's citizens of color also suffer excess death and disability. Health status measurements in the United States confirm the failure of the current fragmented health care system to recognize or respond to the unmet need or the barriers that exist. Predictably, the changes needed to improve the health status of black South Africans are similar to those that are necessary to remedy the situation in the United States. Community-Oriented Primary Care is a health service provision model that holds promise as a comprehensive community-based strategy that can begin to address some of the shortcomings of the current medical care systems of both nations.

(JAMA. 1991;266:2746-2749)

×