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Article
December 4, 1991

Gender Disparities in Health Care-Reply

Author Affiliations

American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Chicago, Ill

American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Chicago, Ill

JAMA. 1991;266(21):2984-2985. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470210052023
Abstract

In Reply.  —Ms Jung raises important concerns that must be addressed in the ongoing exploration of gender disparities. There has been inadequate study of, and concern about, the role of physician gender in clinical decision making. The Council did not include a full discussion of physician gender in its report because of space considerations. Nonetheless, the Council did not ignore the possibility that physician gender may influence gender disparities and concluded that gender disparities may be mitigated by "increasing the number of female physicians in leadership roles... in teaching, research, and the practice of medicine."The Council did not assume that all physicians are men, and gender bias is not confined to them. In the Weisman and Teitelbaum1 review cited by Jung, the authors observed that "male and female patients [emphasis added] are perceived differently, but to date there is no evidence that male and female physicians [emphasis added]

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