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Article
August 3, 1984

Effects of Endurance Training on Glucose Tolerance and Plasma Lipid Levels in Older Men and Women

Author Affiliations

From the Section of Applied Physiology, Department of Medicine, and the I. W. Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis.

JAMA. 1984;252(5):645-649. doi:10.1001/jama.1984.03350050033022
Abstract

Eleven healthy men and women (63 ±1 years) participated in a 12-month endurance-training program to determine the effects of low-intensity and high-intensity training on glucose tolerance and plasma lipids in older persons. Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations were measured for three hours after ingestion of 100 g of glucose and the total areas under the respective curves were calculated. Total plasma lipids and lipoprotein concentrations were determined during fasting. Maximal oxygen uptake increased 12% during six months of low-intensity training; a further 18% increase occurred during an additional six months of high-intensity training. Glucose tolerance, which was normal initially, was not significantly changed after training. However, the total area for insulin was 8% lower after low-intensity training, and 23% lower after high-intensity training, compared with before training. C-peptide concentrations were similarly reduced. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations were unchanged after low-intensity training, but high-intensity training resulted in an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a reduction in triglycerides. These results demonstrate that older persons respond to prolonged, high-intensity endurance training with an increase in sensitivity to insulin and a favorable alteration in their plasma lipoprotein-lipid profile.

(JAMA 1984;252:645-649)

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