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Article
December 11, 1991

Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Author Affiliations

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine Chicago, Ill

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine Chicago, Ill

 

edited by Donald P. Kotler, 310 pp, with illus, $89, ISBN 0-88167-780-9, New York, NY, Raven Press, 1991.

JAMA. 1991;266(22):3203-3204. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470220119045

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Abstract

The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a new disease, and broad clinical experience is limited to all but a few specialized clinicians. The different manifestations are still being defined. Patients often have complicated concurrent diseases. It is considered terminal regardless of the general health of the patient. Gastrointestinal symptoms and malnutrition are common, and may be major causes of morbidity and mortality.

According to the editor, Gastrointestinal and Nutritional Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome codifies the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary complications that occur in AIDS. It stresses current information, and it relates disease pathogenesis in AIDS to known mechanisms.

While primary immunodeficiencies are relatively uncommon, malnutrition, which is the most common cause of secondary immunodeficiency, is recognized throughout the world. The relationship between AIDS and malnutrition is emphasized throughout the book.

The volume begins with an overview of human immunodeficiency virus infection, reviews basic gastrointestinal immunity, and joins the two

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