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Article
December 25, 1991

Use of Animals in Medical Education-Reply

Author Affiliations

American Medical Association Council on Scientific Affairs Chicago, Ill

American Medical Association Council on Scientific Affairs Chicago, Ill

JAMA. 1991;266(24):3423. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470240043021
Abstract

In Reply.  —While testimony against the use of animals in medical education contained in these letters may lead readers to believe that such attitudes are commonplace, the facts speak otherwise.First, the president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has orchestrated a letter-writing campaign to JAMA designed to promote the idea that physicians believe "the use of animals in medical education is unnecessary." On the contrary, in a recent national survey of over 1500 physicians on attitudes toward the use of animals in medical research and education, more than 91% maintained that the use of animals was important for their own training, and more than 93% advocated the continued use of animals for medical education.1It is correct that about 25% of medical schools no longer use animal laboratories as part of the basic science curriculum; however, many of these schools report that the basis for this decision

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