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Article
December 25, 1991

Advances in Early Diagnosis of Perinatal HIV Infection

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Infectious Disease, UMD—New Jersey Medical School, and Children's Hospital of New Jersey, Newark.

From the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Infectious Disease, UMD—New Jersey Medical School, and Children's Hospital of New Jersey, Newark.

JAMA. 1991;266(24):3474-3475. doi:10.1001/jama.1991.03470240096041
Abstract

Early intervention using antiretroviral therapy and prophylaxis for infections has become the standard of care for adults and children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Advances in the field of HIV treatment have resulted in improvement in quality and/or duration of life for patients of all ages. Zidovudine therapy is now approved and routinely indicated for treatment of symptomatic HIV-infected children and for those with evidence of immunodeficiency.1 Prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is routinely recommended for children with significant CD4 lymphocyte depletion, and intravenous γ-globulin has been shown to reduce the rate of serious bacterial infections in some HIV-infected chiidren.2,3 However, for therapeutic interventions to be applied optimally, it is essential for the diagnosis of HIV infection to be made as early in the course as possible, before immunodeficiency and symptomatic illness are manifest. For children with perinatally acquired HIV infection, this is particularly problematic.4,5

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