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Article
September 9, 1992

Diagnosis and Treatment of Early MelanomaNIH Consensus Development Panel on Early Melanoma

Author Affiliations

Conference and Panel Chairperson, Professor and Chair, Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY; Professor of Pathology, Director of Surgical Pathology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md; Associate Professor of Surgery, Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Professor of Pathology, Director, Surgical Pathology, Department of Anatomic Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga; Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Monteflore Medical Center, Bronx, NY; Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology, Duke University, Durham, NC, Clinical Professor of Dermatology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Private Practice, Chapel Hill, NC; Associate Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Research Associate Professor, University of Washington, Seattle; Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md; Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore; Professor of Dermatology and Surgery, Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill; Professor of Dermatology and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Head, Section of Dermatologie Surgery and Oncology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland; Associate Professor of Medicine, Section of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha; Planning Committee Chairperson, Program Director, Skin Diseases Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Senior Science Writer, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Program Analyst, Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Program Analyst, Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Director, Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Professor and Chair, Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY; Cancer Program Specialist, Office of the Assistant Director, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Director of Communications, Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Program Director, Early Detection Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Chief, Clinical Immunology Service, Department of Medicine, Head, Laboratory of Solid Tumor Immunology, Head, Melanoma Section, Division of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Cornell University Medical Center, New York, NY; Chief, Dermatology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Professor of Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Chief, Section of Surgical Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pa; Professor of Dermatology, Pathology, and Laboratory Medicine, Chairman, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Epidemiology Fellow, Office of Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Applications, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md; Associate Chief of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

JAMA. 1992;268(10):1314-1319. doi:10.1001/jama.1992.03490100112037
Abstract

THE INCIDENCE of melanoma of the skin appears to be rapidly rising. The increased incidence may be partially attributable to increased detection resulting from screening. In 1992, approximately 32000 newly diagnosed cases and 6700 deaths are expected in the United States. Melanoma tends to occur in adults in the prime of their family and professional lives. Detection and surgical treatment of the early stages of this malignancy are usually curative. In contrast, diagnosis and treatment in late stages often have dismal results.

Traits associated with an increased risk of developing melanoma include multiple typical moles, atypical moles, freckling, history of severe sunburn, ease of burning, inability to tan, and light hair with blue eyes. Other factors include the presence of familial atypical mole and melanoma syndrome, disorders of DNA repair, and excessive sun exposure.

Efforts to increase public awareness of melanoma and its treatment without causing unnecessary fear present a

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