[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.74.94. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 18, 1992

HIV in Semen

Author Affiliations

Harvard Medical School Boston, Mass

JAMA. 1992;268(19):2651. doi:10.1001/jama.1992.03490190051026
Abstract

To the Editor.  —The importance of semen in the transmission of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was recognized early in the pandemic and proven by the detection of cell-associated and cell-free human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in ejaculates from HIV-seropositive men.1,2 In a more recent larger series, HIV was detected by infectivity assays in the semen of three (21%) of 14 asymptomatic men (Centers for Disease Control [CDC] class II or III) and from eight (40%) of 20 symptomatic (CDC class IV) HIV-positive men.3 This study found no relationship between the detection of HIV in semen and zidovudine therapy or peripheral lymphocyte counts. In a subsequent study4 using the sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay of semen from 23 men not receiving zidovudine therapy, semen samples from six (86%) of seven symptomatic patients and 14 (88%) of 16 asymptomatic patients contained HIV. Both of these studies detected HIV

×