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Article
December 16, 1992

Principles of Neural Science

Author Affiliations

Medical College of Virginia Richmond

 

edited by Eric R. Kandel, James H. Schwartz, and Thomas M. Jessell, 3rd ed, 1135 pp, with illus, $65, ISBN 0-444-01562-0, New York, NY, Elsevier, 1991.

JAMA. 1992;268(23):3381-3382. doi:10.1001/jama.1992.03490230111048

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Abstract

This book has expanded in size through three editions but has maintained its preeminence as a leading text of neurobiology. I use the word "neurobiology" deliberately as it is often referred to as a neurophysiology text. It is not—it is much more. It is a textbook that tries to integrate biochemistry, physiology, and structure with function.

The preface gives the philosophical background of the book, namely, "to write a coherent introduction to the nervous system for a broad range of students of behavior, biology and medicine." I might add that it is also an excellent review of neurobiology for the practitioner who wants to keep up to date with the latest in basic science. The chapters are clearly written (despite multiple authors) and cross-referenced. The cartoons and diagrams are clearly labeled with comprehensive explanations nicely integrated with the text. The reader who has not been in a laboratory for 20

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