[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.159.27. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 12, 1996

The Relationship Between Firearm Design and Firearm ViolenceHandguns in the 1990s

Author Affiliations

From the Violence Prevention Research Program, University of California, Davis.

JAMA. 1996;275(22):1749-1753. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03530460053031
Abstract

IN 1994, an estimated 39720 persons died from firearm-related injuries.1 Firearms now rank a close second to motor vehicles as a cause of traumatic death nationwide. This convergence results not so much from an increase in the firearm-related death rate, which has remained relatively stable for the past 15 years, as from a steady decrease in the death rate from motor vehicle injuries.2 That decrease stems in large part from an explicit focus on the contribution to motor vehicle death rates made by the design and marketing of motor vehicles themselves.3,4

×