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Article
April 11, 1986

Aerobic Exercise and Blood Pressure-Reply

Author Affiliations

Institute for Aerobics Research Dallas

JAMA. 1986;255(14):1877. doi:10.1001/jama.1986.03370140075014
Abstract

In Reply.—  Blood pressure measurements were made with the observer having knowledge of group assignment. We agree with Dr Lewin that blinding the observer to group assignment and measurements with a random zero-type sphygmomanometer would have been desirable. However, we took special steps to standardize all blood pressure measurements according to the guidelines of the American Heart Association.1 Baseline and post-test blood pressure measurements were taken in the same arm, by the same observer, at the same time of day, after ten minutes of undisturbed relaxation. Blood pressure measurements were also taken with measurements of the control group interspersed with those of the experimental group. Bias in determinations of blood pressure seems unlikely given the correlation between blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels (the observer of blood pressures was blinded to baseline and post-test data), with those having the greatest decline in plasma catecholamine levels also having the greatest

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