[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 26, 1996

Linguistic Ability in Early Life and Alzheimer Disease in Late Life-Reply

Author Affiliations

University of Kentucky Lexington
University of Kansas Lawrence
University of South Florida Tampa

JAMA. 1996;275(24):1879. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03530480021021

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

In Reply.  —Dr Massie and Mr Miranda raise issues that we considered when investigating the relationship between writing style demonstrated in autobiographies written at an average age of 22 years and cognitive function and Alzheimer disease assessed an average of 58 years later. We found a strong relationship between low idea (proposition) density in autobiographies written in early life and poor cognitive function and Alzheimer disease in late life.In agreement with Massie, the correlation of density of positive emotion words with idea density was 0.26 (P=.01), and the correlation of density of negative emotion words with idea density was 0.19 (P=.07). However, the correlation with cognitive function, as measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination score in late life, was 0.66 (P=.001) for idea density, 0.19 (P=.07) for the density of positive emotion words, and 0.19 (P=.07) for the density of negative emotion words. While

×