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Article
March 24, 1993

Aerodynamic Handlebars

Author Affiliations

Wayne State University School of Medicine Royal Oak, Mich

JAMA. 1993;269(12):1507. doi:10.1001/jama.1993.03500120045020
Abstract

To the Editor.  —Resnick and Yates1 reported a personal experience with injury accompanying the use of bicycle-mounted aerodynamic handlebars (aerobars) and advocated a cautious approach to their use. Though the popularity of aerobars has increased, their use remains low in the general cycling population, which makes it problematic to survey use patterns.Since an ongoing study of helmet use would involve monitoring large numbers of riders, it was decided to observe the riders of three organized cycling events for aerobar use. The initial findings could guide more formal research activity regarding aerobar users. Of a total of 696 riders, 67 (9.6%) used an aerobar. All of these 67 (100%) wore a helmet and appeared to be of adult age. Aerobar use was seen only in riders on routes of 48 km or more. Helmet use was not mandatory in any of the events. Because the surveyed riders were taking

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