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Article
May 12, 1993

Treatment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-Reply

Author Affiliations

Baltimore County Department of Health Baltimore, Md

JAMA. 1993;269(18):2369. doi:10.1001/jama.1993.03500180060032
Abstract

In Reply.  —What follows is a sequential, point-by-point response to concerns about the "subtextual implications" of our study raised by Drs Vatz and Weinberg.The anti-Ritalin campaign of 1987 through 1989 was fueled primarily by the Church of Scientology.1,2 Dr Barkley3 reported that Church of Scientology "propaganda" claimed that "Ritalin was a dangerous and addictive drug often used as a chemical straitjacket to subdue normally exuberant children because of intolerant educators, parents, and money hungry psychiatrists." Dr Barkley, a child psychologist and behaviorist, concluded that these media statements against Ritalin were "dramatic, exaggerated, and unfounded."3 Bass, a science reporter for the Boston Globe, referring also to the media blitz, noted in 1988 that "in newspapers, television, and radio accounts, Ritalin is often depicted as a dangerous drug being forced on millions of innocent children."2Most drug-sensitive hyperactive children did not do well when taken off stimulant

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