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Article
August 14, 1996

Imaging Atlas of Human Anatomy

Author Affiliations

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine Bridgeton, NJ

 

by Jamie Weir and Peter Abrahams, one CD-ROM, requirements: IBM or compatible PC, 486SX, 8MB RAM, 640 × 480 display, 256 colors, double speed CD-ROM drive, Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later, optimum: Pentium processor, 800 × 600 display, more than 256 colors, ISBN 0-7234-2187-0, St Louis, Mo, Mosby, 1995.

JAMA. 1996;276(6):505-506. doi:10.1001/jama.1996.03540060081046

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

This CD-ROM provides a detailed atlas of radiologic anatomy in all forms, including plain films, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), venography, and angiography. It is formatted to present a concise atlas, cephalad (skull) to caudad (feet).

The disc is easy to work with, and I did not have any trouble setting it up. The graphics and table of contents are laid out well. Navigating the various parts is relatively simple. The opening graphics are well displayed, allowing instant access to pictures or the table of contents; therein lies the simplicity of finding an anatomical part of the body to review. Each screen contains a picture of the radiograph accessed, key landmarks (with a glossary that can be turned off), related slides that can easily be accessed, and a self-exam. The help button is readily available on any accessed slide and overall is helpful in overcoming difficulties with

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